The Data-Centric Architecture

for the Financial World

What's a RDF triple?

Resource Description Framework (RDF) provides the foundation for publishing and linking your data.

RDF is a standard model for data interchange on the Web.


Subjects

(individual things)

I

Predicates

(kinds of relationships)

work For

Objects

(kinds of things)

Organization

Gist Accounting Yin-Yang

Knowledge Graph

For the Financial World


The Gist Accounting Ontology is:

a smart business ontology that makes sense out
of complex financial World Data sets
in a simple way, elegantly.


All core concepts are included with your download for $49,-

  Buy Now  

The Semantic World Data Band

Our Team and Partners.


Sparql Tutorial

A great piece of work

This tutorial covers all the necessary steps for executing a first transaction and then calculating your revenue from it.

Moreover, a bunch of queries are already available for you.


fee sparql tutorial
It's free

Data-Centric
Architecture


your only Asset

Gist Upper Ontology:


The Major Families of Classes

  • All
  • Unit of Measure
  • Magnitude
  • Time
  • Place
  • Landmark
  • Person
  • Organization
  • Stuff
  • Documents
  • Agreements
  • Events
  • Intention
  • Other (Collections, Concept, Language)
Magnitude in Gist
Magnitude in Gist
Time in Gist
Time in Gist
Place in Gist
Place in Gist
Landmark in Gist
Landmark in Gist
Person in Gist
Person in Gist
Oganization in Gist
Oganization in Gist
Stuff in Gist
Stuff in Gist
Documents in Gist
Documents in Gist
Agreements in Gist
Agreements in Gist
Events in Gist
Events in Gist
Intention in Gist
Intention in Gist
Speed up the graph model adoption in your own enterprise,
by killing two birds with one stone.

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Software Wasteland

Software Wasteland:

How the Application-Centric Mindset is Hobbling our Enterprises
by Dave McComb (Author)

Know what's causing application development waste so you can turn the tide. This is the book your Systems Integrator and your Application Software vendor don't want you to read. Enterprise IT (Information Technology) is a $3.8 trillion per year industry worldwide. Most of it is waste.
We've grown used to projects costing tens of millions or even billions of dollars, and routinely running over budget and schedule many times over. These overages in both time and money are almost all wasted resources. However, the waste is hard to see, after being so marbled through all the products, processes, and guiding principles. That is what this book is about. We must see, understand, and agree about the problem before we can take coordinated action to address it.

 
 
The Data-Centric Revolution

The Data-Centric Revolution:

Restoring Sanity to Enterprise Information Systems
by Dave McComb (Author)

Shift from application-centric to data-centric to enable your organization to develop more efficient and successful Enterprise Information Systems. This book is the first part of a trilogy to follow "Software Wasteland". In "Software Wasteland", we detailed the current poor state of application software development.
We offered some tactical advice for reducing some of the worse of the excess. This is the first book in the "what to do instead" trilogy.

 
 
OWL Enterprise

Demystifying OWL for the Enterprise

by Michael Uschold, Ph.D. (Semantic Arts, Inc.)

After a slow incubation period of nearly fifteen years, a large and growing number of organizations now have one or more projects using the Semantic Web stack of technologies. The Web Ontology Language (OWL) is an essential ingredient in this stack, and the need for ontologists is increasing faster than the number and variety of available resources for learning OWL. This is especially true for the primary target audience for this book: modelers who want to build OWL ontologies for practical use in enterprise and government settings. The purpose of this book is to speed up the process of learning and mastering OWL. To that end, the focus is on the 30% of OWL that gets used 90% of the time.
Others who may benefit from this book include technically oriented managers, semantic technology developers, undergraduate and post-graduate students, and—finally—instructors looking for new ways to explain OWL.
The book unfolds in a spiral manner, starting with the core ideas. Each subsequent cycle reinforces and expands on what has been learned in prior cycles and introduces new related ideas.

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